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Land of the free (rent): Census shows one in three young Americans ages 18-34 are living with their parents rather than a spouse

  • One in three Americans aged 18 to 34 are living at home with their parents, a new report from the U.S. Bureau shows 
  • That's more than are living with a spouse (27 per cent), a boyfriend or girlfriend (12 per cent) or alone (8 per cent) 
  • Report also found that more than two million young Americans who are living with their parents are neither employed or going to school

More young Americans are living at home with their parents than with a spouse, a partner or alone, a new Census Bureau report has found.

According to the Changing Economics and Demographics of Young Adulthood report for 2016, one in three Americans ages 18 to 34 are living at home with their parents.  

Coming in second place is living with a spouse (27 per cent), followed by other (i.e. living with a roommate or other relatives, 21 per cent), living with a boyfriend or girlfriend (12 per cent) and living alone (8 per cent).

The study shows a huge change from 1975, when most young Americans (57 per cent) were living with a spouse. Twenty-six per cent were living with parents, 11 per cent with 'other', 5 per cent alone and less than 1 per cent with an unmarried partner. 

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One in three young Americans ages 18 to 34 are now living at home with their parents, a new Census Bureau report has found

The report also found that 2.2 million of the 22.9million young Americans who are living at home with their parents are neither employed or going to school.  

The Changing Economics and Demographics of Young Adulthood report has studied the young adult way of life in America for the past 40 years. 

The latest report also showed that women homemakers are on the decline.

The share of young women aged 25 to 34 who opted to forgo outside employment in favor of managing a household plunged from 43 per cent in 1975 to just 14 per cent last year. Census demographers believe that number could be among the lowest on record.

It's part of a long-running trend of higher educational attainment for women but also a reflection of changing attitudes among Americans.

Meanwhile, more young men are falling to the bottom of the income ladder. In 1975, 25 per cent of young men ages 25 to 34 had incomes of less than $30,000 per year. But by 2016, the share of lower income male earners had risen to 41 per cent.

Women saw some economic gains, with the median income of working women aged 25 to 34 rising from $23,000 to $29,000. Among higher income earners of $60,000 or more, the share of women grew from 2 per cent to 13 per cent. Still, the median income of young women remains $11,000 lower than the income of young men.

'We see more young women who have a college degree and are in the labor force, and they are waiting to get married and have kids,' said Jonathan Vespa, a demographer at the Census Bureau. Demographers found changing U.S. sentiment in which more than half of Americans now believe marrying and having children are not important signs of reaching independence.

More young adults than before are focusing first on receiving a bachelor's degree or higher and securing a job. They are still actively pursuing romantic relationships but opting to cohabitate or court mates while living with mom and dad. 

Young adults may be delaying marriage but that doesn't mean they aren't finding love.

Since 1975, the number of young people living with a boyfriend or girlfriend jumped more than 12 times, from less than 1 per cent to 9 per cent last year. 

  

 

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