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Where's Buzz? Honey Nut Cheerios reveal they have pulled their famous mascot from boxes to highlight the plummeting bee population

  • Cheerio's has removed its mascot 'Buzz' from its packaging boxes 
  • The company said they've done so to stand with endangered bees  
  • For the first time this year a bee species was declared endangered  

The popular cereal brand Cheerio's has removed its mascot 'Buzz the Bee' from boxes in the hope that it will raise awareness for endangered species. 

Cheerio's has chosen to use their platform to stand in solidarity with bees that are at risk of extinction, like the rusty patched bumblebee, which was declared endangered this year.

The company also launched their #BringBackTheBees project in which they handed out over 1.5 billion wildflower seeds to help the bees pollinate.

The popular cereal brand Cheerio's has removed its mascot 'Buzz the Bee' from boxes in the hope that it will raise awareness for endangered species

Cheerios said of the move: "Buzz is missing because there's something serious going on with the world's bees. Bee populations everywhere have been declining at an alarming rate, and that includes honeybees like Buzz.' 

Bees are the invisible back bone of civilization, and are the fundamental facilitator for 35 per cent of the world's food supply

Bees are the invisible back bone of civilization, and are the fundamental facilitator for 35 per cent of the world's food supply, CNN reported.

Scientists estimate that in the United States, we lost 44 per cent of our honey bee colonies from April 2015 to April 2016.

For the first time, a species of bees were declared endangered this year. The rusty patched bumblebee has lost 87 per cent of its population since 1990, scientists say. 

An emerging issue appears to be the presence of the varroa mite, which is a ferocious parasite that can tear through honey bee colonies.

For the first time, a species of bees were declared endangered this year. The rusty patched bumblebee has lost 87 per cent of its population since 1990, scientists say

Pesticides and climate change also have contributed to the colony loss which etymologists have called 'a cause for serious concern'.

On the Cheerio's website, the company lists a number of ways that we can curb the bees endangerment, by encouraging people to plant with their free seeds, and establishing bee habitats around the nation.

The company said that by 2020 they hope to host 3,300 acres on their oat farms dedicated to growing wildflowers that are full of nutrients that the bees need.


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